Photo essay: 2014 Startup Weekend EDU

Startup Weekend EDU was held in Charlottesville from Nov. 14-16, calling all those interested in education and technology to form teams, pitch their ideas, and build solutions in just a weekend.

For the second year in a row, Startup Weekend EDU was held in Charlottesville from Nov. 14-16, calling all those interested in education and technology to form teams, pitch their ideas, and build solutions in just a weekend. The event was organized by a team of dedicated volunteers from the Charlottesville community, with support from Google for Entrepreneurs. Startup Weekend attracted a diverse group of teachers, students, administrators, and designers from across the community. Scroll on for HC Media’s pictures from the event.

This year’s setting was at Monticello High School where attendees had 54 hours to form teams, actualize their ideas, and execute them to reality with resources and services provided by organizers of the event.
The event kicks off at Monticello High School. Attendees had just 54 hours to form teams, actualize their ideas, and execute them to reality.
The crowd listening to an overview of the weekend’s schedule and being introduced to community leaders of the event.
The crowd listening to an overview of the weekend’s schedule and being introduced to community leaders of the event.
They then separated into small groups to exchange ideas, share skill sets, and discuss educational concepts—a warm up of sorts.
Attendees separated into small groups to exchange ideas, share skill sets, and discuss educational concepts before the official pitches.

One of the small groups exchanging ideas during the session.

One of the attendees taking notes during the session.

A spokesperson from one of the small groups talking about the concepts and issues discussed and possible solutions.
One of the small groups talks about the concepts and issues discussed and possible solutions.
Individual pitches were held afterwards, allowing each participant 60 seconds to share an idea.
Individual pitches were held afterwards, allowing each participant 60 seconds to share an idea.
More than 30 ideas were pitched that night , addressing topics such as how to improve teachers' workflow, better ways to manage student life, and more.
More than 30 ideas were pitched, addressing a broad range of challenges for both students and teachers.
The attendees then voted for their favorite ideas, narrowing down the pitches that would be presented on Sunday night to thirteen.
The attendees then voted for their favorite ideas, narrowing down the pitches that would be presented on Sunday night to thirteen.
Teams were then formed and spent the rest of the night working on their pitch.
Teams formed and the new groups then spent the rest of the night working on their idea.
Participants had the chance to work at Monticello High School’s premiere media center known as the Learning Commons and were coached by experienced administrators in the local education community.
Participants had the chance to work at Monticello High School’s premiere media center and were coached by experienced administrators in the local education community.
For most of Saturday, teams focused on user research, making possible prototypes of their products, and preparing their final presentations for the following night.
For most of Saturday, teams focused on user research, making possible prototypes of their products, and preparing their final presentations for the following night.
Judges deliberating Sunday night during final pitches.
Judges listen closely to the final pitches on Sunday night after a long weekend of work.
One of the pitches, Strikey Sensors, proposed using sensors as a teaching tool for baseball players who want to make more accurate throws.
One of the pitches, Strikey Sensors, proposed using sensors as a teaching tool for baseball players who want to make more accurate throws.
After an hour and a half of final presentations and deliberation, the judges were ready to award the teams with the best pitches.
After an hour and a half of final presentations and deliberation, the judges were ready to award the teams with the best pitches.
Third place honors went to GoGoLoc, a fingerprint scanning tool for easy locker access. Attendees who developed the idea were Lisa Boyce, Eric Lidner, Alex Zorychta, and Danielle Watson.
Third place honors went to GoGoLoc, a fingerprint scanning tool for easy locker access developed by Lisa Boyce, Eric Lidner, Alex Zorychta, and Danielle Watson.
In second place was Scheducate, a motivational app aimed at improving students' work ethic. The idea was created by Kathryn Cook, Julia Dyer, Mark “Muggsie” Marini, and Courtney Young-Christiansen.
In second place was Scheducate, a motivational app aimed at improving students’ work ethic. The app was developed by Kathryn Cook, Julia Dyer, Mark “Muggsie” Marini, and Courtney Young-Christiansen.
And coming in first place was Nick Anglin, creator of Strikey Sensors. Congratulations!
In first place was Nick Anglin, creator of Strikey Sensors.
And a huge congratulations to all the participants as well from HC Media!
Congratulations to all the participants!

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